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CHEESE

 
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Loyalist Dave
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Joined: 21 Aug 2008
Posts: 294

Real Name: David Woolsey

PostPosted: Sun Dec 12, 2010 11:38 am    Post subject: CHEESE Reply with quote

I've been working on making cheese. Anybody out there also make their own cheese? I like hard cheeses like cheddar and parmesian.

LD

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Stinky Mike
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 142
Location: Spanish East Florida
Real Name: Mike Harper

PostPosted: Fri Dec 24, 2010 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've cut the chesse a few times...... ;-)

Sorry Dave, but i had to. this post sat here for too long un-answered. it was like throwing down the gauntlet, slapping my face with a glove, etc. :)

but on a serious note, how is chees made? i have no idea. do you do it PC or use modern methods? is there a difference between modern methods and PC methods? are the cheese you make the same ones made here?

thanks and merry christmas and a happy new year.

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"Well, it [the bible] seems to be a good book-strange that the white people are not better, after having had it so long" Chief Yonaguska (Drowning Bear)
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Loyalist Dave
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Joined: 21 Aug 2008
Posts: 294

Real Name: David Woolsey

PostPosted: Fri Dec 24, 2010 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheese is actually simple. I use a specific modern press, because it's about 200% cheaper than many of the other presses, modern or PC.

I don't have access (yet) to unpasteurized milk either.

Basically you need to curdle whole milk, slightly. You can add a bacteria like that found in buttermilk to warmed whole milk, or you can add vinegar or lemon juice. In the first method, the bacteria produces an acid over time, like over say an hour or two. In the other method you are good to go after you stir in the acid. Then you add rennet, which causes the curdled milk fat and milk protein to thicken up like in a custard. You "cut" the thickened, rennetted milk with a dull knife, while it's still in the pot, forming it into small chunks, and it will get a bit harder, and separate into curds and whey, like little Miss Moffat ate in the nursery rhyme. (The water is called "whey") So you then drain off the whey, and gently mix in some salt to the curds. Then the salted curds go into a cheesecloth lined mold, and pressure is added to press it for several hours to get more whey out. Take it from the press, and you have cheese. You can then let it air dry a couple of days, then wax it for several months to let the bacteria "age" the cheese.

The type of bacteria and the trouble you go to removing the water content = the flavor of the cheese. The milk type sometimes changes the cheese too, if you use goat, or sheep's, or water buffalo. IF you use an acid without bacteria, you get something like mozarella, or ricotta.

Anyway, it came out like good Feta, but I didn't use goat milk. I am trying some different things, and I hope I can make a proper PC mold and press next year. I am also experimenting with proper sources for the bacteria, instead of laboratory made stuff. The overall cost is very good compared to buying similar cheese in the store. Takes a few hours to get it into the press though.

LD

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Gonzales
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Joined: 29 Oct 2007
Posts: 103
Location: Saint Louis
Real Name: Larry Gonzales

PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2011 9:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just saw this.

Thanks for posting.
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beaudro
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Joined: 19 Mar 2008
Posts: 10
Location: oklahoma
Real Name: allen harrison

PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2011 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I got interested! I found several kits online , complete with everything but the milk. Do all the recipes take 3 months to produce the first batch?
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Loyalist Dave
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Joined: 21 Aug 2008
Posts: 294

Real Name: David Woolsey

PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 2011 1:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I used Leener's as my source, and you can eat the stuff at the end of the first pressing if doing a hard cheese, and the softer stuff is ready to go when done. Now IF you want aged cheese like a cheddar, then you have to let it be, but they have a "farmhouse" cheddar that you can eat the same day.

The key is to use proper milk, and if pasteurized, be sure it has a long way to go to expiration. Be careful with adding a pint of cream to the milk, for "ultra pasteurized" milk won't work, and apparently the same may be true for ultra pasteurized cream. I omitted the cream, and got good results.



LD

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beaudro
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Joined: 19 Mar 2008
Posts: 10
Location: oklahoma
Real Name: allen harrison

PostPosted: Sat Jan 29, 2011 12:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Leeners is what I had found, seem to be the best so I went with that. I went ahead and got the deluxe super duper kit they had.
I'm going to start looking for an original cheese press, I was noticing the web site said pressing is a tricky thing, more weight isn't necessarily better.
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Loyalist Dave
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Joined: 21 Aug 2008
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Real Name: David Woolsey

PostPosted: Sun Jan 30, 2011 5:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Um gee, well it just depends on the type of cheese. Very hard cheeses like cheddars and parmesians..., you need weight. Leeners has 45 lbs in one of their recipes for cheddar. WOW. I have used a Kettle Bell as it sits well on the plastic press. I have a standard sized one and a slightly smaller one. Otherwise a jug of water will give you a good press.

There are two types of traditional presses..., the fruit/wine press style and the Amish or Lever style..., I'd make the Amish style if I was going traditional, as it seems easier.

The reason I didn't do this before is that many or the vast majority of cheese presses run $100 or more!!!!

LD

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kopfjaeger
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Joined: 28 Apr 2012
Posts: 136
Location: Pennsylvania
Real Name: Frank Ciletti

PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2014 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm a munster and provolone cheese lover. ☺

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