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Buffalo Powder horns

 
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Kentuckian
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2007 1:42 pm    Post subject: Buffalo Powder horns Reply with quote

Hey, gang.

Does anyone have (or know where I can find) photos of some original, 18th-century buffalo powder horns? I've seen references to them being used in early Kentucky, among both natives and whites, but I haven't seen any images. I'd imagine they were simple affairs, without much carving or scroll work, but I'd like to see some actual examples.

Thanks for any and all input or suggestions.

-Ben
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JasonMelius
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2007 3:29 pm    Post subject: Re: Buffalo Powder horns Reply with quote

Kentuckian wrote:
Hey, gang.

Does anyone have (or know where I can find) photos of some original, 18th-century buffalo powder horns? I've seen references to them being used in early Kentucky, among both natives and whites, but I haven't seen any images. I'd imagine they were simple affairs, without much carving or scroll work, but I'd like to see some actual examples.

Thanks for any and all input or suggestions.

-Ben


On page 78 of the Clash of Empires exhibit catalogue there is a photograph of a buffalo horn. It was constructed between 1765 and 1770. I'm not sure if it is still with the exhibit in DC or not.

Jason
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rick tull
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2007 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Madison Grants book "Powder horns and their architecture" has one found in Canada, but no further info is given. It looks earlier than the western tacked up examples one usually sees. Most of the old eastern ones I have seen have been drinking horns. Good luck, I would like to see examples of these also!
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Boulanger
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 80
Location: Fort Pontchartrain du Détroit
Real Name: Jeff Pavlik

PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2007 12:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have often wondered about using a buffalo horn as a Frenchman here in Michigan. The only documentation that I have so far is this excerpt from Kalm.

" Wild Cattle are abundant in the southern parts of Canada, and have been there since times immemorial. They are plentiful in those parts where the Illinois Indians live, which are nearly in the same latitude with Philadelphia; but further to the north they are seldom observed….. The flesh equals the best beef in goodness and fatness. Sometimes the hides are thick, and may be made use of as cow-hides are in Europe. The wild cattle in general are said to be stronger and bigger than European cattle, and of a brown red colour. Their horns are but short, though very thick close to the head…. The Indians and the French in Canada make use of the horns of these creature to put gun-powder in. " Peter Kalm Travels in North America 1749

This link is to the historic bison range. It might give you an idea if bison were in your area.

http://www.discoverlife.org/nh/tx/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Bovidae/Bos/bison/images/Bison_bison_map.mx.jpg
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Randy Hedden
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Joined: 19 May 2007
Posts: 13
Location: Illinois
Real Name: Randy Hedden

PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2007 12:26 pm    Post subject: Re: Buffalo Powder horns Reply with quote

A little bit out of the 18th century, but William Clark carried a buffalo powder horn on the Corp of Discovery. This horn is contained in the Museum of Westward Expansion in St. louis, MO. It is inlayed with ivory or bone and what appears to be ebony or other dark wood. You can find a picture through Google.

Horns decorated like this one were apparently a regional style of horn that appeared in and around the St. Louis area at the turn of the century as several have been found to still exist.

Randy Hedden
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