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Let's talk blacksmithing...
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quaker
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2009 10:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been smithing for about 4 years. Have the anvil, homemade coal forge, swage block, post vice, collection of hammers, hardies, tongs(bought and made), etc. Make mostly gun parts, knives and stuff for the forge and workshop. Had a double bellows I made but replaced it with a squirrel cage blower and though it's not period, it sure is a lot easier to weld.

Spend too much time with the day job and need to quit and spend more time in the forge. Unfortunately the bill collector doesn't agree.
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Hawkeye
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Joined: 18 May 2007
Posts: 473
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Real Name: Darylee Foertsch

PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2009 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

quaker wrote:
..........Spend too much time with the day job and need to quit and spend more time in the forge. Unfortunately the bill collector doesn't agree.


My mom retired ...quitting the day job, and still doesn't have time to do much of what she wants....

Great post.

_________________
http://www.muddyflint.com/ http://muddyflinttrades.com/
Empty pockets never held anyone back. Only empty heads and empty hearts can do that.—NORMAN VINCENT PEALE
If interested in American Co-Masonry; http://www.co-masonry.org/
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Hawkeye
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Joined: 18 May 2007
Posts: 473
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Real Name: Darylee Foertsch

PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2009 1:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

skunkkiller wrote:
did any of you guys or gals see retemperring mainspring if? is so any ideas? skunkkiller


Don Abbott wrote:
Quote:
does anyone know if you can retemper a mian spring ? I have a weak mianspring in my pistol the spring is still good but is weak can I heat and spread a little and retemper? skunkkiller


Tempering is the final stage of heat-treating. Steel must be hardened before it is tempered.

If you heat your spring enough to bend it easily, you will have destroyed the original temper, therefore, you will have to first re-harden, then re-temper.

Your biggest worry with springs is to go too hard (not enough temper). Too hard = too brittle = broken spring.

If you go too far, you get a soft spring, so you have to start from scratch on your heat-treat.

Here's some links that might help:

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/GunTech/NewsletterArchive.aspx?p=0&t=2&i=623

http://www.ctmuzzleloaders.com/ctml_experiments/tempering/tempering.html

http://www.muzzleloadermag.com/HINTS%20%28stoves%29/Other%20Suggestions.htm
(see "Tempering Springs")

Hope this helps,

Don


Just wanted to let you know this post helped me out a bunch too....

_________________
http://www.muddyflint.com/ http://muddyflinttrades.com/
Empty pockets never held anyone back. Only empty heads and empty hearts can do that.—NORMAN VINCENT PEALE
If interested in American Co-Masonry; http://www.co-masonry.org/
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caoxueer1r
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue Aug 11, 2009 10:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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dannyb55
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2009 5:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am a smith. I have been for 19 years. I currently have a London anvil, a side draught forge, a hand cranked drill press and a sweet champion blower.
To be authentic to the 18th century I would need a Birmingham anvil, a Bicirn, a scotish beam drill and a two chambered bellows. The Bellows and drill are easy to make,The anvil, not so much. Somebody made some a year or two ago but I didn't have the money. Of course I would have to burn charcoal, which is a pain in the arse and wrought iron, which is very hard to get.
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Mike Ameling
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2009 8:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The double chamber ... great bellows ... was only starting to come into use in the late 1700's. In the 1750's, Diederot drew lots of images of pairs of single-stage bellows in the various shops. But very few images of the great bellows - 2 chamber. So be a little careful about the dates of using the Great Bellows.

Same thing with the hand-cranked blower. There are existing/remaining examples of blowers from the early 1700's on back into the 1600's. But they don't have cast-iron mass-produced form-fitted housings.

Those cast-iron forges with hand pumped or cranked blowers are from the very late 1800's, but mostly early 1900's. Just look in the reproduction 1903 Sears or Wards catalogs. THey were sold as Farm Blacksmithing Setups.

So do a little research on the equipment, and make sure it fits the time period and culture you wish to replicate.

Just my humble thoughts to share - from someone with a Roman or Viking era blacksmithing setup on up to current modern equipment.

Mikey - that grumpy ol' German blacksmith out in the Hinterlands
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dannyb55
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Mon Nov 02, 2009 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Salem, NC, Colonial Williamsburg, Jamestown Restoration, all have great bellows. Diderot Illustrates many 2 chambered bellows. You can tell by the nail pattern. The French valves are slightly different and their forges are side by side with multiple fires. None of those smiths are dancing between 2 pull cords. I have as much experience as any real smith at restoring and building great bellows. Real industrial smithing needs water power, slave labor or a great bellows.
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Hawkeye
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Joined: 18 May 2007
Posts: 473
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Real Name: Darylee Foertsch

PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 11:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mike Ameling wrote:
The double chamber ... great bellows ... was only starting to come into use in the late 1700's. In the 1750's, Diederot drew lots of images of pairs of single-stage bellows in the various shops. But very few images of the great bellows - 2 chamber. So be a little careful about the dates of using the Great Bellows.

Same thing with the hand-cranked blower. There are existing/remaining examples of blowers from the early 1700's on back into the 1600's. But they don't have cast-iron mass-produced form-fitted housings.

Those cast-iron forges with hand pumped or cranked blowers are from the very late 1800's, but mostly early 1900's. Just look in the reproduction 1903 Sears or Wards catalogs. THey were sold as Farm Blacksmithing Setups.

So do a little research on the equipment, and make sure it fits the time period and culture you wish to replicate.

Just my humble thoughts to share - from someone with a Roman or Viking era blacksmithing setup on up to current modern equipment.

Mikey - that grumpy ol' German blacksmith out in the Hinterlands


It is tidbits like this that I will sorely miss.

_________________
http://www.muddyflint.com/ http://muddyflinttrades.com/
Empty pockets never held anyone back. Only empty heads and empty hearts can do that.—NORMAN VINCENT PEALE
If interested in American Co-Masonry; http://www.co-masonry.org/
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okie
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 3:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And arrogant SOBS Like Danny that make me not even want to visit this. How much of an ass do you have to be to argue with a man that has passed. He can take is 2 chamber bellows and shove it!!!!
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Hawkeye
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Joined: 18 May 2007
Posts: 473
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Real Name: Darylee Foertsch

PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 3:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And is why I ignored that and posted the way I did. I am certain he missed the notice.

I will truely miss Mike Ameling
posts and advice.
He has helped me greatly.

There is a somewhat famous writing about my thoughts on this.
It is called "How do you live your Dash".

In short. Our toumbstones all have a born date and a deceased date.
The space in between is often a straight line.. .a dash.

How do you choose to live your Dash?

_________________
http://www.muddyflint.com/ http://muddyflinttrades.com/
Empty pockets never held anyone back. Only empty heads and empty hearts can do that.—NORMAN VINCENT PEALE
If interested in American Co-Masonry; http://www.co-masonry.org/
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Don Abbott
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Joined: 17 May 2007
Posts: 113
Location: East Tennessee
Real Name: Don Abbott

PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 8:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I figure that is probably the greatest tribute that a craftsman (or craftswoman) could wish for.

I'll never make a striker that I won't think of Mike.

I'll never do a drop-tong weld, forge a fork, or make pintel hinges that I won't think of Vance Baker.

I'll never think about teaching blacksmithing or just generally how to treat people without thinking of Paw Paw Wilson.

Somebody did the same for each of them; maybe we will be blessed with the opportunity to do the same for someone who crosses our path.

Don
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TiminIndiana
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Joined: 19 Dec 2009
Posts: 34

Real Name: Tim Wieneke

PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2009 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well here's a familiar face. Hello Don. It's Tim Wieneke from Primal Fires. Very interesting forum here. I've always been curious about trekking. Good to see you.

Tim
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Don Abbott
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Joined: 17 May 2007
Posts: 113
Location: East Tennessee
Real Name: Don Abbott

PostPosted: Mon Dec 28, 2009 6:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Howdy Tim. Welcome.

Yep, this is one of my daily stops. Here, Primal Fires, and Iforge are on my list.

A lotta good info to be had.
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hellbilly075
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Joined: 31 Jul 2009
Posts: 140

Real Name: eric armour

PostPosted: Mon Jul 26, 2010 5:41 am    Post subject: Smithin' Reply with quote

I myself am an unrepentant iron bender. Been doin it bout 15yrs or so. I picked it up as a matter of course with my persona being a middling farmer of Scotch extraction on the frontier of Cantuckee. Lost my anvil in a flood (I swear!) and have been using a piece of rail since. I dont care who you are there is something magical about bending the elements to do your bidding and making something useful. My shop is all hand tools. Id like to do it all by hand first then maybe cheat some as I get old(er). Gotta learn yer numbers before you can do math...knowwhatimean? Hellbilly
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hssforge
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Joined: 05 Jul 2010
Posts: 9

Real Name: rick evans

PostPosted: Tue Aug 17, 2010 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello friends.

I started in at a friends shop about 12 years ago. I was fascinated by the way he could move the metal in exactly the way he wanted it to go, the fire, the hammers, the anvils and the tools.

The process of manufacturing something using these blacksmithing tools was what hooked me most. I would love to have a forge that resembles a mid 18th century shop, but I am happy to use my modest collection of tools, hammers and anvils to fashion useable stuff from iron and steel.

Glad to see this forum and add it to myplaces to check for conversation (virtual, but still conversation) and information.

God Bless.

Rick
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