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Can anyone help identify this sword?

 
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Steppenwolf
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Joined: 17 May 2007
Posts: 45
Location: Vancouver's Island
Real Name: Kevin Grant

PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2007 1:36 am    Post subject: Can anyone help identify this sword? Reply with quote

Hello,

I have posted this a couple of places on the net and I thought I would try here. Could someone help identify this sword? Loa = 27.5", blade 22.5" x 1" wide. On top of the back of the blade near guard there are the following marks "T" or "E" "RLLV" "L" or "I"



You will never guess what I did. Getting a book down from the shelf the sword was on I knocked the sword off. It fell point first on my big toe. So I just got back from the hospital where I got a tetanus shot. I was their first sword puncture. lol

This beast may be an altered bayonet. The fuller doesn't seem to match any bayonet fuller of this basic shape that I can find. I wonder if it is a French Briquette. The guard appears to be of the same age and condition as the blade. The handle is a sore spot, along with my toe, it is bulky and isn't as graceful as the guard and blade.

Thanks
Kevin

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Kevin Grant

Of all the rules you must recall, powder first and then the ball.
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Nick Barber
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Joined: 17 May 2007
Posts: 8
Location: Michigan
Real Name: Nick Barber

PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2007 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cool looking little sword. From the looks of it it is made out of an old bayonet, likely a french Chassepot bayonet, they were in use from the mid 19th cent. up until WWI if memory serves me right.
As far as a sword it should fit the bill as a hunting sword pretty well. I have an hunting sword I made out of an old beat up enfiled bayonet that I picked up.
Sorry to hear about the toe, at lest it makes fora cool story.

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Molon Labe
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Michael Archer
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 290
Location: West of Fort Pitt
Real Name: Curt Schmidt

PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2007 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How d' ye!

IMHO, my impression is that it is a sword bayonetrecycled and turned into a hunting sword.

I would have to check the books for measurements , but the blade profile reminds me of the 1854ish era U.S. M1841 Rifle "Mississippi Rifle" sword bayonet OR the U.S. M1855 Rifle sword bayonet.

Michael Archer

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Michael Archer
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Pathfinder
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2007 1:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Model 1840 Heavy Dragoon saber was known as "Old Wrist Breaker", obviously the one you have is the more infamous and very rare "Old Foot poker"! You are fortunate that your foot wasn't more severely injured as many early injuries included toe amputation, large gaping instep lacerations and many chipped foot and ankle bones. These weapons were used from mid-18th century up until the "Hague Conventions of 1899" where the Polish Government was finally convinced to disarm their army of it's 200,000 "foot pokers". It is rumored that the French Army may have as many as 1,000,000 of these still stored in armories where they have been since Napoleon outlawed them in order to help in his efforts to conquer Europe!

Pathfinder
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Steppenwolf
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Joined: 17 May 2007
Posts: 45
Location: Vancouver's Island
Real Name: Kevin Grant

PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2007 5:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pathfinder,

Thanks for the chuckle. I am most fortunate that "Ole Foot Poker" is dull or my toe would have been pinned to the floor.

Consensus is that it is a altered bayonet. Should I leave as is or should I make an appropriate, more sword-like hand?

Cheers
Kevin


Pathfinder wrote:
The Model 1840 Heavy Dragoon saber was known as "Old Wrist Breaker", obviously the one you have is the more infamous and very rare "Old Foot poker"! You are fortunate that your foot wasn't more severely injured as many early injuries included toe amputation, large gaping instep lacerations and many chipped foot and ankle bones. These weapons were used from mid-18th century up until the "Hague Conventions of 1899" where the Polish Government was finally convinced to disarm their army of it's 200,000 "foot pokers". It is rumored that the French Army may have as many as 1,000,000 of these still stored in armories where they have been since Napoleon outlawed them in order to help in his efforts to conquer Europe!

Pathfinder


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Kevin Grant

Of all the rules you must recall, powder first and then the ball.
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Pathfinder
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kevin,
The bayosword is pretty neat………….“neat” is an old guy’s word…..anyway, if it was me I’d remodel the handle to make it comfortable. S&S firearms out of New York used to have ray or sharkskin and brass wrapping wire to refit old sabers. The only other issue may be how to make a scabbard for it………………..but it really is a cool (another old guy word) sword ! Looks like fun! Great for a Ranger looking to be a bit different!

Pathfinder
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Lloyd Moler
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Joined: 16 May 2007
Posts: 297
Location: Priest River, Idaho
Real Name: Lloyd Moler

PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kevin,
Mike Keller from Enumclaw, WA made several out of old bayonetts that look very simular to that one. I picked up a nice old German bayonett blade from Joe Williams (The Gun Works) down in Springfield, Oregon. I have a cross guard made and am trying to decide if I want a bone, antler, or sculpted bone grip on it. I guess I will finish it someday.

Lloyd

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raymond the younger
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:41 pm    Post subject: which hurt more Reply with quote

Hey,
which hurt more and sword wound or your doctor bill from the visit..

love the sword by the way...

lol,
raymond the younger
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Capt Mike
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2007 6:23 am    Post subject: sword Reply with quote

I now can identify your sword accuately.

Its mine !

I can email you my address and i'll even pay shipping for your trouble finding my sword and keeping it safe. Im thankful to you for such a nobel thing,,,,(smiles) hehe

It IS a very very nice sword. Id love to have something like that,,even if it was a reproduction. I have the major hots for a hunting sword ever since I read were Squire Boone carried one.

Congrats on a fine item.

Capt Mike
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Rod L
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Joined: 16 May 2007
Posts: 226
Location: the Forks of the Yellowstone and Missouri
Real Name: Rod Lassey

PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2007 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice conversion of an old bayonet, it looks to very well done. That style of bayonet blade is called a yataghan, by the way, and a number of different countries used this style in the mid to late 1800's. The US was one of them, but they were more commonly seen on the ends of rifles from Great Britain (Martini-Henry), Denmark (Remington rollingblock), and Germany (all sorts of different rifles). The guard covers it up, but it should be maker marked at the base of the blade. Have fun with it!

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Michael Archer
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 290
Location: West of Fort Pitt
Real Name: Curt Schmidt

PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2007 3:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How d' ye!

Blade profile, and fuller arrangement would appear to eliminate the U.S.
M1855 Rifle sword bayonet, U.S. M1841 Rifle sword bayonet, British M1856 Enfield sword bayonet, and British M1860 "Martini Henry" sword bayonet.

I need to take a look at the U.S. NM1859 Sharps sword bayonet yet.

Alas, I have no resources for the foreign "yat's."

Michael Archer

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Michael Archer
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