This site best viewed at 800x600 or greater resolution. Please support Our Advertisers. They make this site possible!

HistoricalTrekking.com
Small Horizontal Row
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in
 CalendarCalendar   LinksLinks 
Tallow vs Petroleum
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    HistoricalTrekking.com Forum Index -> Message Board
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Bill Evelyn
Guest





Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2007 2:24 pm    Post subject: Tallow vs Petroleum Reply with quote

200 years ago, I would've slid some deer, bear, 'possum, old cow, etc. rendered fat down the barrell to protect my smoothe gun from moisture.
And I probably would have shot my gun every few days, either to shoot more deer, bear, 'possum or heffer,...so my gun would be re-swabbed every few days with the fat stuff, and everything would be right in the world.

Today, however, I shoot perhaps 4 times a year and I lube my smoothebore with commercial oil that hasn't been part of a living thing since the dinosaurs walked the earth.

Question for you tallow-users: Do you see any adverse reason to using fat in your gun if you don't burn powder in that weapon but a few times a year?
Seems to me animal fat...even mixed with wax...would draw the attention of bugs, dogs or wives.
Back to top
Isaac
User


Joined: 21 May 2007
Posts: 289
Location: Ouisconsing, Pays d'en Haut
Real Name: Isaac Walters

PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2007 2:45 pm    Post subject: Re: Tallow vs Petroleum Reply with quote

Bill Evelyn wrote:
Seems to me animal fat...even mixed with wax...would draw the attention of bugs, dogs or wives.


Once rendered, animal fat does not really go rancid and seems to not attract anything abnormal, wierd, or dislikable.

_________________
We shall never achieve harmony with land, any more than we shall achieve absolute justice or liberty for people. In these higher aspirations, the important thing is not to achieve but to strive.
Aldo Leopold
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Condé
User


Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 233
Location: Mouth of Wilson, VA
Real Name: Tom Condé

PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2007 3:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I find that animal fat, in my case, bear oil, seems to hold up over long periods of time better than modern stuff. I rarely shoot anymore and was having trouble with modern oils "drying" between handlings. Was having to oil once a month or so. Maybe it's just me, but the bear oil seems to stay better.

_________________
Condé
"Sometimes I wonder whether the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on or by imbeciles who really mean it." -- Mark Twain

___

Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted. ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

"If you are gonna be dumb you better be tough"

___________

www.condetrading.com
Back to top
Find all public pictures posted by %s View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
KarlK
User


Joined: 24 May 2007
Posts: 287
Location: Grand Portage, Minnesota
Real Name: Karl Koster

PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2007 4:55 pm    Post subject: Oil Reply with quote

My gun has not seen anything but rendered animal fats/tallow/bear greaee and some bear oil for the past 12 years, maybe more...Some years I fire numerous times, others only a few times a year, few squirrel hunts, maybe turkey or deer and of course plinking at a range or backyard. I have never seen a problem occuring in the lock or barrel or any iron on the gun.
Karl Koster

I just cannot for the life of me see why anyone would shove chemicals or modern petroleums down a historic firearm? Seems like a common sense no no...?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
David Brown
User


Joined: 18 May 2007
Posts: 78
Location: The Old Southwest-backwoods Cherokee country
Real Name: David Brown

PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2007 8:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have been given to understand that petroleum based oils do not mix well with natural fats, so if you decide to go natural you need to thoroughly scrub and degrease your barrel before starting in on the natural regimen. Natural fats are said to "cure" the metal in a similar fashion to curing an iron skillet. I highly recommend the natural route. There are so many types to choose from, all of which work and most of which can be used to fry rattlesnake in a pinch. :-)

_________________
Everybody needs to believe in something.
I believe I'll have a beer.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
qcpidoc
User


Joined: 29 May 2007
Posts: 137

Real Name: Michael J Kinstler

PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2007 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been using a mixture of bear oil and beeswax as a lube and protectant for years and the barrel, wood and locks all seem to season even more with time. I occasionally will use bear grease by itself in the barrel but find the mix works better but I do swab before loading.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rod L
User


Joined: 16 May 2007
Posts: 226
Location: the Forks of the Yellowstone and Missouri
Real Name: Rod Lassey

PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2007 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Natural oil is the way to go, it seems that petroleum can get kinda gummy in the bore for me. Maybe I wasn't trying the right stuff, but once I started on natural oils, I never looked back. And much more historically correct, to boot, which is a real plus for me. Bear oil works great, unfortunately bears are somewhat hard to come by in ND, and when found, the Fish and Game people really frown on killing one and rendering the fat. However, racoon fat is virtually identical in texture and consistency, and renders into a very nice light oil. A fall killed coon will have a good 1 1/2 inches of fat over its etire body, and will render enough oil to keep you shooting for a very long time. The one I got several years ago gave me nearly 2 quarts of oil, I'm still working on it. And coons are found everywhere, so supply is no problem. With the addition of a little beeswax, it'll make a great patch grease, too ----and hair pomade, joint liniment, laxative, etc. Wonderful stuff.

Rod

_________________
...yet in a Short time they become disgusted with our manner of life...and take the first good Opportunity of escaping again into the woods, when there is no reclaiming them.
B. Franklin, 1753
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AxelP
User


Joined: 23 May 2007
Posts: 313
Location: Yosemite
Real Name: Ken Prather

PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2007 10:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use Ballistol or the new Lehigh Valley Lube...both non petroleum based-- Both work very well... In the field i use a bear/olive oil beeswax mixture and it too works maavelous. For prolonged storage I use Ballistol ----its the very best. I have left guns for 6months straight and they look perfect when I check them...

I would never put petroleum based oils in my muzzleloader... it seems to react negatively to burnt black powder residue and takes a lot more time to clean out...its gunkier---- in my experience that is...

Axe
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
sharps4590
User


Joined: 30 May 2007
Posts: 60
Location: Missouri Ozarks
Real Name: Vic Schaefferkoetter

PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 4:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll have to concur with everyone else regarding rendered animal fats. I do mix them about half and half with beeswax and since using them, starting 15-20 years ago, I've never had that first "brown patch" I always got with other products.

If I remember what I read a long time ago, upon firing there is a reaction that takes place between the sulphur in black powder and petroleum based products and that's what causes the asphalt like gunk.

Vic

_________________
Make always certain you are right, then go ahead
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bill Evelyn
Guest





Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 8:33 am    Post subject: Tallow: Ready to Jump In...How? Reply with quote

Thanks for the many replies on tallow use. I'm ready to jump in. Can you point me toward a "how to" book or article on the proper way to render fat...dispatch a critter, cube him, boil the meat, skim the fat that rises to the top, re-boil that fat, let cool, mix with wax...?

"What are you doing, honey?" my sweet wifes asks. "Boiling a raccoon, of course, to render it's fat..." I explain. "Couldn't you do that OUTSIDE...?" she asks... Yep, it's an outdoor activity.

And lastly, do you apply the tallow to the barrel using tow? I would think so, but certainly would love to hear of historical alternatives.
Back to top
Bill Evelyn
Guest





Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 8:35 am    Post subject: Tallow: Ready to Jump In...How? Reply with quote

Thanks for the many replies on tallow use. I'm ready to jump in. Can you point me toward a "how to" book or article on the proper way to render fat...dispatch a critter, cube him, boil the meat, skim the fat that rises to the top, re-boil that fat, let cool, mix with wax...?

"What are you doing, honey?" my sweet wifes asks. "Boiling a raccoon, of course, to render it's fat..." I explain. "Couldn't you do that OUTSIDE...?" she asks... Yep, it's an outdoor activity.

And lastly, do you apply the tallow to the barrel using tow? I would think so, but certainly would love to hear of historical alternatives.
Back to top
Stalking Turkey
Guest





Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have been using bear fat for over seven years for my musket, knives, mocs, and my self. Another thing that I like about it, a little goes a long way. I still have some that is over six years old.
Back to top
Morgan
User


Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 184
Location: Arkansas
Real Name: Morgan Hodkin

PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Where are you getting your bear fat/oil from?

Morgan

_________________
"It is when people forget God that tyrants forge their chains." Patrick Henry (1736 - 1799)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Rod L
User


Joined: 16 May 2007
Posts: 226
Location: the Forks of the Yellowstone and Missouri
Real Name: Rod Lassey

PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 11:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rendering coon oil is simple--the fat on a coon is on the outside of the carcass, you'll notice this when skinning. Just cut off all the fat you can from the meat (you'll get a little meat, too, don't worry about it), and throw it in a cast iron pot over LOW heat. You want to melt the fat, not ignite it. It'll melt and kinda boil/sizzle for awhile, eventually all melting down. At this point, dip out the meat and connective tissues which have cooked--deep fat fried, really--and pour off the liquid into whatever container you want to keep it in. If using a glass bottle, let it cool a bit before pouring or the bottle may break. The stuff in the bottle will, over time, separate into a clear oil on top and a creamy slightly thicker oil below, usually about half and half. I suppose you could then separate the two, but I don't, it all works great.

As for cleaning, when I go to oil the bore I screw my tow onto the worm, dip it in the oil in the bottle, and wipe it down. I also wipe the oily tow over all exterior metal and wood surfaces as well, giving some measure of water repellantcy.

Rod

_________________
...yet in a Short time they become disgusted with our manner of life...and take the first good Opportunity of escaping again into the woods, when there is no reclaiming them.
B. Franklin, 1753
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Michael Archer
User


Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 290
Location: West of Fort Pitt
Real Name: Curt Schmidt

PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How d' ye!

I have used a bear oil/beeswax mix for the past 12 years. I would prefer to use panther oil instead, but it is harder to get These Daze.

The only "caveat' I have ever seen or read was for not using salt-cured bacon grease due to the salt and the risk of attracting every stray dog, cat, raccoon, and skunk for miles... :-) :-) :-)

Michael Archer

_________________
Michael Archer
Heretic
Rewardink. wery, wery, wery rewardink.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    HistoricalTrekking.com Forum Index -> Message Board All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You must Register or Log In to post new topics in this forum
You must Register or Log In to reply to topics in this forum
You must Register or Log In to edit your posts in this forum
You must Register or Log In to delete your posts in this forum
You must Register or Log In to vote in polls in this forum
Back to HistoricalTrekking.com
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group - This site created 11/24/99 by Historical Enterprises.
Photos, Text, Graphics, and Design Copyright © 1999 - Present Historical Enterprises. All Rights Reserved.
Exact Matches Only