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Period fishing.... a BLAST!
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Rod L
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Joined: 16 May 2007
Posts: 226
Location: the Forks of the Yellowstone and Missouri
Real Name: Rod Lassey

PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2007 6:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As I read it, the nets used were the type that were strung across the current of the river, then later hauled back in. Not something for the individual, for sure, but useful at a permanent post. There is also reference to netting through the ice, mainly for whitefish, by NWC and HBC employees. I haven't found that for down here, but they were usually talking about netting on lakes as opposed to rivers. Certainly more than one way to catch a fish.

By the way, in my previous post I didn'y mean that pole weren't used, just that they were cut along the bank as needed, and discarded just as easily.

Rod
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Susan
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 119
Location: Memphis on the Mississippi
Real Name: Susan Wallace

PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2007 8:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting passage from a new -old-book. 1791, by J. Long.

The first day of our encampment we killed a hare, made fish-hooks of the thigh bones, and baited them with the flesh. The lines were made of the bark of the willow tree cut into slips, and twisted hard together. Success crowned our endeavours, for we not only caught sufficient for present use, but enough for the remainder of the journey to Lake Manontoye.

The book is Voyages and Travels of an Indian Intertpreter and Trader. J Long. I ordered just one copy, and will add as a general offering after Ft de Chartres.

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Susan
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Tim Richards
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 21

Real Name: Tim Richards

PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2007 9:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Susan, Long is one of those (A Henry the Elder another) who documents using nets under the ice, details how it was done. Key difference, I guess, is that the net references are subsistence-related as opposed to angling for pleasure. Henry the Elder also relates using up to 20 set lines at a time, visiting them every day and generally having a good enough catch to feed a hundred men. As a side note, Henry the Elder does mention "the amusements consisted chiefly in shooting, hunting, and fishing." so maybe points to recreational fishing, too.

Sorry to divert the original direction of the thread.
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Rod L
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Joined: 16 May 2007
Posts: 226
Location: the Forks of the Yellowstone and Missouri
Real Name: Rod Lassey

PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2007 8:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hugh Faries also makes much mention of netting in both summer and winter in his diary. Interestingly enough, Peter Pond speaks of a fellow ice fishing with a hook and line. Ice fishing's pretty popular out here, I wonder how much of a spectacle I'd make of myself, out there amidst the pre-fab fish houses, chopping a hole in the ice with an axe and dropping a line in!

Getting back to the subject at hand, as Diggler asked, are there any good sources for period hooks? Has anyone tried the ones from historicalanglingenterprises? I've tried making some myself, but just wasn't satisfied with them. I've also seen some from various vendors that I doubt would work, either. Anybody have a maker that they have tried and recommend?

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...yet in a Short time they become disgusted with our manner of life...and take the first good Opportunity of escaping again into the woods, when there is no reclaiming them.
B. Franklin, 1753
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Don Beltrami
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 76
Location: New England
Real Name: Don Beltrami

PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2007 9:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm takin' a shot at making a rod. Picked out a couple of bamboo pieces, wrapped the handle w/ thread, tried the idea of putting a wire loop at the tip to attach the line to. I found some brass tubing at a hardware store, so I'll use that to attach the sections. My question is:how do you fit the top section into the ferrule so that it won't be loose. Mine has enough of a size difference between the top sect and the ferrule/tube that it is loose. I have another section of tube that is small enough to fit the top section snuglyand this tube section is small enough to fit inside the ferrule on the bottom section. what do you say about that kind of metal to metal connection? Or should I just wrap the end of the top section with thread to build up its diameter? Ive also thought about wrapping the "handle" section with leather- any suggestions?
Thanks, Don
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Yaquina143
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2007 10:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know what to tell you about the ferrules, I have all of mine custom made to size at a machine shop so they fit. I ran into the same issue you are when I first starting my experiments with rod making and decided to just get brass that fits, rather than trying to fill the gap.

I will say however that wrapping them with thread to make up for a gap will probably not work. It is easy to get a rod to fit together with brass tube, but to get a proper enough fit that it can handle the stress of being bent is something else entirely. I went through a lot of trial and error before I got the angling rods I make to flex and fit properly. If there is any weakness in the joints the rod will flex more at the joints than at the spine and will break at the worse possible time.

If you do wrap with thread to make up for the gap, I would suggest you give the thread a soak in epoxy to harden it. I know it is not "period", but it will help strengthen the weak spot at the joint and allow it to function and bend properly and would not be visable when the rod is finished.


Last edited by Yaquina143 on Tue May 22, 2007 11:30 am; edited 1 time in total
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Yaquina143
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2007 3:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here are a few pictures of the gear I finished making this evening.

From what I can tell from research, the landing net was in some cases a rather simple affair of a net slung over a bent branch and in others it was fancy specially made net for angling. I decided to make the latter of the two.

The landing net shown is roughly 24" inches long in total. I spun the handle and neck out of curly maple, the net hoop is steam bent oak. The net itself is black cotton cord.





Another item I found a reference for is a "hatch horn" or "stone fly horn". These were much like a powderhorn, but designed to carry live bait, such as stone flies or whatever else was the current hatch for the stretch of river you plan to angle. In my case I carry crickets, so I guess you could call what I made a "cricket horn".

The horn is smaller than an average powder horn, roughly 9" inches long, and is covered with small holes. These keep air circulating in the horn and keeps the bait alive and well.... at least until they end up on the hook. This will hang on a simple cord from the strap of my creel.



I also made myself a small fly box, something every serious angler requires for a day on the shore. This box measures about 6" x 3" x 1" inches and holds a few flys and hooks as well as my wonderful tiny handmade English float that I got from Paul at HistoricAnglingEnterprises.com.

The flys stay secure in the box by their hooks, sunk into sheepskin. The leaders that are tied to them are made of catgut. This small box fits perfect in my weskit pocket or angling pouch.


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nopaosak
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2007 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Awesome! I love the bait horn haha.

I took an old bamboo rod (not period) that had no guides on it and tied a line to the end. I played with casting a fly for quite a while. You would be surprised how far you can get it. You have to be very precise when you push forward to cast because if you aim to high your fly drops like a stone when it hits the end of it's length, but if you get it just right, that fly pops nicely onto the surface.

I have a could carry overs from last years hatchery dump that are hiding in some tree fall on the bank behind the house. I am going to get them tomorrow now that the veggies are in. I'll take pictures.
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Capt Mike
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2007 11:13 pm    Post subject: yep Reply with quote

Flyfishing has been one of the great loves of my life. Im about to go back 250 years with it.
Dana, would you share your opinions, book suggestions,,,ect. with me via email ?
You have hit the center of my heart with this colonial fishing subject...IM ALIVE AGAIN !

thanks.
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