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Trail Foods--How did it Go??

 
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Paul C. Daiute
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Joined: 02 Mar 2010
Posts: 151
Location: Fort Western, On the Kennebec in Mayne 1740s-1760
Real Name: Paul C. Daiute

PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2016 7:53 am    Post subject: Trail Foods--How did it Go?? Reply with quote

A while back I posted some well documented recipes for 18th century foods in the "Trail Food section". I was interested in some feed back, (no pun intended). Has anyone used the recipes and were the recipes helpful, did you have any problems cooking them, any suggestions, or updates on research concerning these foods?
Paul
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bob miller
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Joined: 28 Jan 2009
Posts: 132
Location: Sharbot Lake,Ontario
Real Name: Bob Miller

PostPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2016 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Paul. I'm glad that you followed up on this. I read your posts re trail food with much interest. I make a similar "slapjack" and was intrigued by the use of corn meal, however here in New France, we tend to look down on corn , making much use of wheat. Wheat bread is actually a staple here, making up 2/3 to 3/4 of our diet. I'm still researching "Duff" to determine if it would be appropriate. I very much appreciate your instigating this topic since , like everything else, food I have found is a matter of time and place
I was surprised to learn that our Pope has deemed that the eating of beaver meat on Friday is OK, since , it is a creature of the water , as a fish.
Of course , all that I have said is only valid prior to the British victory on the Plains of Abraham. I welcome new information from all sources.
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Sanscoeur
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Joined: 16 May 2007
Posts: 93
Location: Tulsa, OK
Real Name: Mike Piper

PostPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2016 8:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Concerning French septentrionale corn consumption:

“The men who are in Louisiana are accustomed themselves to maize, but the women, who for the most part are natives of Paris, are very reluctant to eat it. This makes them grumble a great deal against the Bishop of Quebec who had made them understand they would be coming to the Promised Land.”

Bienville to Ponchartrain, 6 September 1704

Old Mobile, Fort Louis de la Louisiane 1702-1711
Jay Higginbotham
Tuscaloosa: U of Alabama Press, 1977. 225

For years French Louisiana was almost totally dependent on grain imported from France because the hopeful habitants were slow to get the idea that the poor soil and forests of the Gulf coast weren't suitable for the raising of wheat crops. By the time Illinois finally became a wheat producer of some volume the Gulf coast residents had become used to locally produced rice flour as a substitute for wheat flour. Corn wasn't embraced as a cash crop and was still relegated to livestock until after the Louisiana Purchase.

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Paul C. Daiute
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Joined: 02 Mar 2010
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Location: Fort Western, On the Kennebec in Mayne 1740s-1760
Real Name: Paul C. Daiute

PostPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2016 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Guys,
Thanks for your responses. I am very interested in what folks have done with the information I have offered. This will make the second time that I have inquired about the usefulness of the furnished info. One wonders what happens to shared research? After thousands of hits I have yet to hear back from anyone who may have used the recipes!
Paul
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AxelP
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Joined: 23 May 2007
Posts: 308
Location: Yosemite
Real Name: Ken Prather

PostPosted: Tue Aug 30, 2016 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paul I have tried your duff pudding recipes and the ships bread, and have done the boiled beef thing and they have been good additions to my camp food. Thank you sir.

I used flour that I ground in my hand grinder and found that my ships bread was not as hard--- it was hard but fairly easy to eat plain and unsoaked. I think due to the larger grind and whole grain nature of my flour.

Ken Prather

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Paul C. Daiute
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Joined: 02 Mar 2010
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Location: Fort Western, On the Kennebec in Mayne 1740s-1760
Real Name: Paul C. Daiute

PostPosted: Wed Aug 31, 2016 12:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ken,
Interesting, as you may remember My first experience with uncooked ships bread and eating it with out soaking resulted in my breaking a tooth. The British Navy's bake houses did use a well ground flour. As far as I can tell from what I've read the bread was broken up and soaked and or cooked in such a way that the bread ended up soft. Could have been kept in the mouth ands softened with saliva. Your hand ground flour could have it's advantages.
Paul
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AxelP
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Location: Yosemite
Real Name: Ken Prather

PostPosted: Wed Aug 31, 2016 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was surprised at how it was able to break apart so easily and yet it is quite hardy. I have a bag of them and they seem to be holding up great and I can actually bite and eat them without soaking...but they seem hard as rocks. Not sure why. they are dry and rather tasteless but heck they would certainly keep a person alive for a time. I did use salt in mine though.

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