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For the bite of a rattlesnake ...

 
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Bruce
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sun May 20, 2007 6:00 pm    Post subject: For the bite of a rattlesnake ... Reply with quote

"For the bite of a rattlesnake, a great variety of specifics was used. I remember when a small boy to have seen a man bitten by a rattlesnake brought into the fort on a man's back. One of the company dragged the snake after him by a forked stick fastened in its head. The body of the snake was cut into pieces of about two inches in length, split open in succession, and laid on the wound to draw out the poison, as they expressed it. When this was over, a fire was kindled in the fort yard and the whole of the serpent burned to ashes, by way of revenge for the injury he had done. After this process was over, a large quantity of chestnut leaves was collected and boiled in a pot. The whole of the wounded man's leg and part of his thigh were placed in a piece of chestnut bark, fresh from the tree, and the decoction poured on the leg so as to run down into the pot again; after conlining this process for some time, a quantity of the boiled leaves were bound to the leg. This was repeated several times a day. The man got well; but whether owing to the treatment bestowed on his wound is not so certain."

Joseph Doddridge
Early Settlement and Indian Wars of Western Virginia and Pennsylvania
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Ironmule
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Joined: 20 May 2007
Posts: 4
Location: Dewy Rose, GA
Real Name: Jeff Smith

PostPosted: Sun May 20, 2007 8:38 pm    Post subject: Six of one, a half dozen of the other,,, Reply with quote

Most plants produce natural antibiotics in their leaves and shoots to protect them from infection as critters bite them off in browsing. A poultice as described may have protected against infection.

On the other hand, a rattlesnake's poison is a protien it uses to both kill mice and predigest them. The damage done to wound sites by the venom is from this digestion of the muscle tissues around the wound. Something like 80% of the strikes of humans are "dry" strikes with no or very little venom injected. If there's no venom, any cure will "work "

Primitive Archer magazine has a long running series of articles by Zimmerman on aboriginal medicine; using modern medical science to examine what it is in the herbs that works. I can't find a copy in the mess of the house just now, but it's a long running series.

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Pathfinder
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2007 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The true cure for rattlesnake bite is to bite them before they bite you. The use of olive oil and corn meal will make the whole affair more palatable!

Pathfinder
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Fitzhugh Williams
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 384
Location: Greenville, SC
Real Name: Fitzhugh Williams

PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2007 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not much taste to rattlesnake. Alligator is much better!
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Pathfinder
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2007 9:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not many Gators in west Texas or Colorado Rockies.........so I'll take your word for it!

Pathfinder
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