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gourd
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skunkkiller
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Joined: 14 Jan 2008
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Location: monroe 53566City or ZIP/Postal Code
Real Name: duane stanke

PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2009 2:02 pm    Post subject: gourd Reply with quote

I made a gourd bowl but I don't know what to do about the inside to make it food worthy can any one help me out.

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Tsegoweleh
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2009 2:14 pm    Post subject: Groud Reply with quote

Oatsayo,
I will use a bit of beeswax to seal my " Grouds" LOL Just teasing you pal.

Gourd impliments such as water containers will last longer with a bees wax or pitch coating. Alot of Gourd impliments were just desposable. But then They had alot of them. Try the wax, But you will have to re do it occasionally.
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wayne1967
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Joined: 26 Jan 2009
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Real Name: Wayne Musgrave

PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2009 4:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I heat it all up with a heat gun inside and out and then pour really hot parafin inside and out. [/img]
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badWind
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2009 4:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

why use toxic parafin??? its made from petroleum... use beeswax..
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wayne1967
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Joined: 26 Jan 2009
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Real Name: Wayne Musgrave

PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2009 4:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bee's wax is really $. They use parafin on the oak water kegs you see.
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qcpidoc
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Joined: 29 May 2007
Posts: 137

Real Name: Michael J Kinstler

PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2009 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why not a natural product like beeswax?, yes it's more expensive than paraffin but you're talking still less than a dollar's worth. It's like saying I use spray paint instead of milk or oil-based paint cause I got it on sale at Wally world. Sorry but I'm the husband of a bee keeper and don't own any oil wells or pray towards Mecca.
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wayne1967
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Real Name: Wayne Musgrave

PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2009 6:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not really. My Mom has left over parafin from back when she use to use it to seal jars of jelly and such so it's free. Bee's wax around hear costs $14 a block. May not be PC but it works for me. Sorry I posted.
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Russ
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2009 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Parafin would not be my first choice but it would work. The problem with parafin is that after time it will begin to flake off the gourd. Food grade parafin is sold in the canning isle at most grocery stores. Somthing a little more authentic would be brewers pitch.

Speaking of gourds. This is my first attempt at growing them. Any advice.
I was already told not to plant them next to my cucumbers because the gourds will taint the cucumbers and make them bitter.
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Black Hand
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Joined: 16 May 2007
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Real Name: Albert Grobe

PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

badWind wrote:
why use toxic parafin??? its made from petroleum... use beeswax..

Paraffin is not toxic....
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Captain Midnight
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Joined: 26 Jun 2007
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Location: Clarksville, TN
Real Name: Jeffrey Greene

PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 6:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Black Hand wrote:
badWind wrote:
why use toxic parafin??? its made from petroleum... use beeswax..

Paraffin is not toxic....



You're right there. Paraffin is used extensively in home canning. They use it to seal food in Mason jars.
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badWind
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

but its NOTfor eating.. its PETROLEUM.... like engine OIL, GASOLINE....
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lee a
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 6:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Then why can you buy parafine to use in chocolate when makeing candys, and other good things made from chocolate.
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Captain Midnight
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Joined: 26 Jun 2007
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Location: Clarksville, TN
Real Name: Jeffrey Greene

PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 7:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

badWind wrote:
but its NOTfor eating.. its PETROLEUM.... like engine OIL, GASOLINE....



Right. It is not for eating. But the paraffin designed for food use is NOT toxic, otherwise they would not make it to seal over the top of your jellies and such in the jar. But you won't be eating it out of the canteen, either, at least no more so than you would get from a home canned jar of jelly.
However, I do agree 100% with the idea of using beeswax. Beeswax is a pure, natural wax that will not harm you if ingested, and they had it back in the days we reenact. Plus it will make the water in your canteen taste "sweeter" sometimes.


Last edited by Captain Midnight on Wed Apr 01, 2009 7:19 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Captain Midnight
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Joined: 26 Jun 2007
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Location: Clarksville, TN
Real Name: Jeffrey Greene

PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 7:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are different types of paraffin. Some are for candle-making, which is the type that indeed cannot be eaten, then there is the type for canning and candy-making and such. Read this exerpt from an article concerning paraffin over on About.com:
Quote:
Question: What is paraffin wax?

What is paraffin wax and why is it in my chocolate candy recipe? Is it edible? Where can I find it?

Answer: Paraffin wax, classified as a chemical preservative, is widely used on fruits, vegetables, and candy to make them shiny and pretty as well as to retard moisture loss and spoilage. Waxes are made from vegetable oils, palm oil derivatives, and synthetic resins, as well as other materials. Some people, notably those who are allergic to aspirin, may be sensitive to many waxes, depending on their ingredients.

Yes, it is edible. Paraffin wax is often added to chocolates. The addition of paraffin to the chocolate candy gives it a nice, glossy finish and helps it remain solid at room temperature. Be aware that paraffin is flammable when overheated, so warm it gently in a double-boiler or microwave only to the point where it is melted.

You can find paraffin wax, also sometimes called baker's wax or canning wax, in your grocery store where canning jars and supplies are sold. Paraffin is still commonly used (although not recommended) to seal home-canned jellies and jams. However, some paraffin is not intended to be ingested, such as that sold for candlemaking, so check the label.

Gulf Wax Paraseal Canning Wax, Household Paraffin Wax is a popular brand of paraffin used for canning and chocolate-making.


Article can be found here: http://homecooking.about.com/od/cookingfaqs/f/faqparaffin.htm
Hope this helps.
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Turning Bear
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Fri Apr 03, 2009 8:27 pm    Post subject: Wax? Reply with quote

I just eat out of gourd bowls, put some lettuce, plantain leaves or cornhusks as a liner if you like. Its not ...that... bad. The bowls crack easily enough so a lot of work could be seen as a waste. Stew grease also helps a little. Just scrape it out to clean it good with the flint from for flint and steel kit

I'm not sure people would waste beeswax or any wax on a gourd bowl in olden times
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