This site best viewed at 800x600 or greater resolution. Please support Our Advertisers. They make this site possible!

HistoricalTrekking.com
Small Horizontal Row
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in
 CalendarCalendar   LinksLinks 
Trekking Skillet...
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    HistoricalTrekking.com Forum Index -> Message Board
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Curmudgeon
User


Joined: 19 Dec 2008
Posts: 27
Location: Old North West Territory...
Real Name: Butch Lanier

PostPosted: Fri Dec 26, 2008 11:58 pm    Post subject: Trekking Skillet... Reply with quote

I purchased a trekking skillet through- randrmetalworks.com. Made right here in Michigan. The skillet is very nice with folding handle and a lid quality hand pounded (you can see the marks) . They were a pleasure to deal with and would highly recommend them.

T.S.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Joe K
Guest





Real Name: Gary D. Morrison

PostPosted: Sat Dec 27, 2008 12:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Curmudgeon,

I have one of the same it has been cooking meals for many years and works great. R and R are great people and only live a few miles away. You will not be disappointed with any of their kit
Back to top
Mike Ameling
Guest





Real Name: Gary D. Morrison

PostPosted: Sat Dec 27, 2008 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yet another ... folding handled skillet.

I would be willing to bet that Madison Grant wishes he would never have included that one "folding mess kit" with only a verbal family history link to the Rev War in his hunting pouch book - since so many people are using it as "documentation" for their version.

Even MB fell for it.

They are nice, but just another modern ... interpretation ... of what might have been. That one variation of that old saying: if they would have thought of it, they would have had it.

Just my humble thoughts to share, and best used in conjunction with your own research.

Mikey - that grumpy ol' German blacksmith out in the Hinterlands

p.s. Yes, nowdays so many people DEMAND that a blacksmith leave hammer marks all over their work - to SHOW/PROVE that it was "hand made". Such a reversal from reality of those early times.
Back to top
Curmudgeon
User


Joined: 19 Dec 2008
Posts: 27
Location: Old North West Territory...
Real Name: Butch Lanier

PostPosted: Sat Dec 27, 2008 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My bad I didnt know that this was a modern piece of equipment, the website I thought said it was documented. I should have done my own research. What is correct for the times just a regular skillet? Also where does everyone do their research, unfortunately I have found that my library doesnt have much in that time span. Where to look ??? Thanks for the info.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Mike Ameling
Guest





Real Name: Gary D. Morrison

PostPosted: Sat Dec 27, 2008 9:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Madison Grant put that ONE example in the back of his Hunting Pouches book as a ... curiosity or unusual but neat item. But he clearly marked it as a ... folding mess kit ... and noted that the family history associated with it said it was carried in the Rev War by a specific person.

But that is the one and only original anybody has come up with for those folding handle skillets, and written accounts of them are also lacking. Yes, they are nice and handy, just not documented.

But the story of them as a "documented" item still continues. And many makers/vendors perpetuate that myth.

Skillets of the time period generally had a long fixed handle. They were generally made form sheet iron (some brass/copper), with an iron handle riveted on. Plus that handle tended to be fairly long - so you could hold it and cook with it over an open fire. 9 to 14 inch long handles were common, but some went all the way up to 2 or 3 feet. Voyageurs are depicted in various artwork with skillets having those 2 to 3 foot handles.

They are a pain to pack along with that long fixed handle, but the documentation is there for them.

Your library should be able to get books through the Inter Library Loan program. Some charge for it, some don't. But if they do, it is only for the shipping.

Some books to aid your search:
Collector's Illustrated Encyclopedia of the American Revolution and the companion book Early American Antique Country Furnishings. These are two pretty good books in general. They have a few problems with dates on some specific items, but are mostly pretty reliable.

Where Two Worlds Meet
Voices From The Rapids
These two are about original arifacts recovered from underwater searches below rapids in several rivers up around the Great Lakes - where there were documented wrecks with lost goods from a tipped over canoe. The first book shows the items with general discussion. The second book is the more scholarly one with some pictures of the items, and charts of what was found and where.


A Toast To The Fur Trade

Firearms, Traps and Tools of the Mountain Men - much more than just the western Rocky Mountain fur trade era

The Packet volumes I, II, III, IV by Mark Tully. More Rev War focused, but good info for most any reenactor. These are along the lines of the various Sketchbook type of books, but better documented.

The Voyager Sketchbook
The Longhunter Sketchbook
Sketchbook 76
The Distaff Sketchbook

The Museum of the Fur Trade Quarterly

And Karl K says that the current issue of Food History News has a great article on sheet iron and/or tin kettles (pail type).


Plus there are a number of web sites out there to ... browse through. A good one is the Trade Goods of New France web site. http://www.lanouvelle-france.com/

On The Trail magazine and Muzzleloader magazine have good researched articles in them, as do several others.

This research stuff can be fun and frustrating all at once. But it does take time.

That's why many people like to follow in the footsteps of Mark Baker with his Sons of a Trackless Forest book, and his two books that are compilations of his articles in Muzzleloader magazine over the years -- A Pilgrim's Progress volumes I and II. The first book has the articles up to around 1996, the second continues from there. Mark has done lots of good work and research (in books and in the field), but gets a lot of flak because too many people have gone the easy route and turned themselves into "clones" of him instead of following in the spirit of his research. They see a picture of him and then just duplicate it - sometimes right down to the very same colors of the clothing.

Beth Gilgun also has a book out of some of her articles in Muzzleloader magazine - Tidings From The 18th Century. Much more good info.

Mark's and Beth's books are available through Muzzleloader magazine itself, or through many vendors.

Muzzleloader magazine also put out the Book of Buckskinning series. I think they are up to 9 volumes now. More great info and articles.

Mark also has 4 video's out - The Longhunter series. And John Curry also has a video or two out. They are through American Pioneer Video. Hershel House the gun maker also has several Beginning Blacksmithing videos through them. And his cousin Willy White has one on Knife Making.

And then there are the several "conferences" that are held each year.

Down at Boonseboro, they hold that Kentucky Woodsman Weekend several times a year. Great info and presenters. And Muggs Jones has filmed a bunch of the presentations, and has CD's out of them.

But the older one is that put on by the NAVC - North American Voyageur Council. They have been holding a fall conference for over 30 years. Their emphasis is more on the northern Great Lakes area fur trade, but lots of the info translates to many other areas and time periods. They also try hard to have interactive sessions - where you get to make your own item. Examples: making a tin lantern or cup, forging up your own flint striker, making a birch bark container/mukuk, sewing up mocs, basswood bark weaving, trade silver, knife making (included nekkid midnight sword forging!), wild rice preparation, small animal skinning and hide prep, etc. Next year's conference will be the first weekend of November and about 20 miles north of Madison WI - Thursday through Sunday morning.

I hope this helps gives you some leads to get you started on your own research.

Mikey - that grumpy ol' German blacksmith out in the Hinterlands
Back to top
LRB
User


Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 256

Real Name: WICK ELLERBE

PostPosted: Sun Dec 28, 2008 8:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very good post Mike, but I would add that contrary to what many beginners glean from MB, and some others, longhunters did not travel on foot. They had pack horses to carry their gear and hides. They still needed to travel light, but they did not hump their gear on their backs. Boats were also used in those regions where necessary, or practical.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Swanny
User


Joined: 17 May 2007
Posts: 186
Location: Two Rivers, Alaska
Real Name: Thomas Swan

PostPosted: Sun Dec 28, 2008 11:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
A Toast To The Fur Trade


I'm afraid I have to question this sketchbook as a source. It has some OK general information, but some of the items depicted are out of context both chronologically and geographically. For example, one of the sketches depicts a sort of hand sleigh that was sketched by Alexander Murray in 1847 - at Fort Yukon, Alaska in the context of a Great Lakes region camp.

It's a nice idea, would be a useful piece of gear for the trekker who recreates it, but most likely wouldn't fit the time/place that trekker is trying to recreate.

Swanny

_________________
A good dog is so much a nobler beast than an indifferent man that one sometimes gladly exchanges the society of one for that of the other. (William Francis Butler) Stardancer Historical Freight Dogs at http://www.tworiversak.com/mushing.htm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Okwaho
User


Joined: 16 May 2007
Posts: 215

Real Name: Tom Patton

PostPosted: Sun Dec 28, 2008 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would like to compliment Mike on his post and have some comments of my own:

I'm not familiar with "A Toast to the Fur Trade"so won't comment.
I cannot recommend any of the "Sketchbook 56" series.
I agree with LRB that contrary to what Baker seems to be saying ,longhunters especially those going after meat,hides,or salt would have used horses.These were professionals and as such needed horses to pack in their supplies and pack out the results of their labors.
Tom Patton

_________________
The French always make good allies for Indians
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Lloyd Moler
User


Joined: 16 May 2007
Posts: 297
Location: Priest River, Idaho
Real Name: Lloyd Moler

PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 10:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have made several of those folding handle skillets for prizes at the firelock shoot I use to sponsor. I am not going to make any determination as to whether they are authentic or not. The colonial Americans had the ability to make hammer out sheet iron skillets, and they had the ability to make hinges,,,,,,,,, did they ever see the advantage of mixing the two???? I don't know. Like everyone else, I sure wish old Madison would have included a little more documentation on that skillet.

Now, a friend down in Utah had a small French skillet with a removeable wood handle (a lot like the pots that are in the Washington Mess Kit) and I think it is the cat's meow. However, I can't really document the skillet yet I can document a bunch of pots and even one coffee pot with the same handle setup to the period. What to do.

I think my next skillet will be something like the one in this painting (This is a small section taken from a late 17th century Flemish painting)


_________________
With this I remain, My Dear Sir, Your most Humble and Obedient Servant

Lloyd Moler
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Ed...Maurer....
Guest





Real Name: Gary D. Morrison

PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 11:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I carried one of those skillets for awhile, then realized it was of little use. I took to carrying only a small pot and a tin cup and never looked back. What does one do with a skillet on the trail? I never really got the benefit of it. In Camp, where I had eggs, yes. Trail; no.

What would my fellow readers do with theirs on the trail?
Back to top
Lloyd Moler
User


Joined: 16 May 2007
Posts: 297
Location: Priest River, Idaho
Real Name: Lloyd Moler

PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2008 12:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fried Pig meat my friend, and fried hoe cakes, and fried apples, and fried fish.

I ain't British and I hate boiled meat of any kind.

I also don't care for broiling on a stick unless the meat is fresh killed.

_________________
With this I remain, My Dear Sir, Your most Humble and Obedient Servant

Lloyd Moler
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Ed...Maurer....
Guest





Real Name: Gary D. Morrison

PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2008 12:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah, Lloyd, I took to using rocks....but, boy howdy, where THEY a pain in the ass to pack!
Back to top
DELETED
Guest





Real Name: Gary D. Morrison

PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2008 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DELETED
Back to top
okie
Guest





Real Name: Gary D. Morrison

PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2008 9:07 am    Post subject: skillets and horses Reply with quote

You know everyone goes on to the land of MB and i think that is great, but i do agree that traveling a foot was not the way to go. I am not going to walk and pack my calving supplies much less walk into an elk camp. BUT how feasible is it for the average trekker to keep a string of horses? Then comes the question of how authentic is your horse???? Horses today tend to be much larger than those of the 18th century. I think Gerry Barker told me they averaged around 14 hands or 56 inches. Then comes the color? I keep around 8-12 geldings around that are on a rotation. Most of them are on the bigger side and sorrel. All have brands be it freeze or hot iron. How authentic are my brands? I just don't see a man heading off into the woods on a long winter scout with all his gear on his back. Then how does he get the hides, meat, or salt out?? I wouldn't pack it but i am naturally lazy. Just some more ideas. As far as the skillet goes i have something like that. It is more of just a sheet iron bowl. I agree about boiled meat. but the main reason was for my hoe bread. I exploded a rock and kinda got chilled by the experience and never liked the taste of ash so i guess i have a questionable item, but i eat good.

And don't forget the worms and grubs...... <G>
Back to top
shorthunter
User


Joined: 17 May 2007
Posts: 36
Location: Carroll County MD, near Liberty Lake.
Real Name: Chuck Boblitz

PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2008 9:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bear.
I totall argee with the Boy Scout part of your discussion. Also, being a former Scoutmaster, nothing brings a little extra magic to a camping trip like cooking on something besides the BSA stuff. The folding skillet and nesting pots have wowed several guys in my troop in the past, and this included the adults in the group too.

Okie,
Nothing is worse than having a rock explode while cooking or enjoying a campfire. We need to remember that old river/stream stones still can explode years after the water source has dried up. I once saw a case at Summer Camp where a boy had a rock explode and had to get 110 stitches in the inside of his thigh. The pieces of hot rock just missed several major areas of concern. So we need to make sure we not only know what equipment to use, but also what natural elements not to use.

Chuck

_________________
A man never stands as tall as when he bends down to help a child.
Back to top
Find all public pictures posted by %s View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    HistoricalTrekking.com Forum Index -> Message Board All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Page 1 of 6

 
Jump to:  
You must Register or Log In to post new topics in this forum
You must Register or Log In to reply to topics in this forum
You must Register or Log In to edit your posts in this forum
You must Register or Log In to delete your posts in this forum
You must Register or Log In to vote in polls in this forum
Back to HistoricalTrekking.com
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group - This site created 11/24/99 by Historical Enterprises.
Photos, Text, Graphics, and Design Copyright 1999 - Present Historical Enterprises. All Rights Reserved.
Exact Matches Only